SLUSH WEEK 2/5 – Planning part two

Yesterday we spent a large portion of the day preparing material, agreeing on demo structure, flow and material. We talked about having a simple yet to-the-point elevator pitch on our stand, so that our visitors get a nice and coherent experience. Today is about making sure everything makes sense.

Yesterday we spent a large portion of the day preparing material, agreeing on demo structure, flow and material. We talked about having a simple yet to-the-point elevator pitch on our stand, so that our visitors get a nice and coherent experience. Today is about making sure everything makes sense.

I bumped into Pauli Waroma’s (Chairman of the marketing agency Sherpa and ex-CMO of Pihlajalinna) LinkedIN post about strategy and how it is often challenging for companies to communicate it effectively (or even come up with a good one).

I replied that “A good strategy is easy-to-understand, simple and most of all a goal-orientated plan.” The strategy is not for you. You should already know what you’re doing. The strategy is for everybody else, most importantly your target customer. How are you going to win their attention and hearts? Remember, today’s customers are smarter than ever. They have an abundance of information, tools and opinions around them. How are you going to stand out?

This also made me think about this classic demotivational poster:

It’s not only about standing out. It’s about standing out while being relevant and true to your product and customer.

So this made us think about our strategy for Slush once more. A good communication strategy is indeed something that:

  • Gets your message and products noticed.
  • Is easy to understand.
  • Has a key statement.
  • Is simple enough without losing meaning.
  • Has a call to action embedded in it.

Having this perspective helped us to plan ahead and make sure that we take full advantage of the valuable time each booth visitor has. Let’s say we have a generous number of 50 prospect conversations on our Friday demo booth day, that would translate to 5 per hour during a 10-hour-day.

If we spend 5 minutes with each visitor, thats 5 x 5 = 25 minutes of talking every hour, for 10 hours. That’s 25 x 10 = 250 minutes or 4 hours and 10 minutes of talking. I will leave it up to your imagination how to keep conversations relevant and to the point.

If you have 5 minutes per person, you might have just 15 to 30 seconds to get them interested (and even shorter time to get their attention).

This of course also meant that I created a dedicated project in Media Pocket for Slush 2019, tagged everything accordingly and shared this project with my colleagues for collaboration. This way at least all our media assets are extremely easy to find and presentable during our presentation.

After today the pre-events and roundtable sessions begin. I am attending a session hosted by Jonathan Rochelle – Chief Product Officer of Zapier. Prior to joining Zapier in 2019, he was the Director of Product Management at Google. So I really try to just absorb as much as I can.

Check back tomorrow as I will post an update in the evening about tomorrow’s activities.

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